Many websites nowadays have grown into enormously complex beasts with multiple bits and quite often bits that do not work. Other websites now make the journey into the site so horrendous, what with cookie popups and the occasional ‘please turn off your ad blocker’ popups that one cannot get past. I come across these almost daily when performing seemingly routine tasks or looking for information.

Where there is an error but one still needs to interact to gain something, perhaps modification to a service or to purchase something, you are then left with a struggle to find out what to do next. In some cases it is simple, go elsewhere. But in others, say, your energy provider while you are still in contract, one must persevere.

As an example, one energy provider makes the point that, in order to cancel a particular part of the service you can phone or go online.  They explain that should you phone you will be waiting in a queue so why not do it online? Oh but if so, you need to cancel before the renewal date whereas if you phone you can cancel up to 14 days after renewal. Ok, but the relevant section of the website simply never works and gives an error page saying you need to phone. The online chat also has a queueing system of course so no help there.

So, do website owners or whoever does their marketing actually look at errors? There is an issue here if they rely on external analytics providers such as Google Analytics because the analytics cookie may not be set at the point of error and may only be set at the actual generic error page. That may give a trail where someone clicks on a link on the main website which then errors, but not so if one follows the published direct URL. The web server log itself would be saviour here but I suspect that marketers neither know about them nor have access anyway.

Errors aside, I also wonder how many look into their analytics to see the number of people that failed to get any further into the site than the home page. This may be people like me that, when faced with an armoury of popups simply go elsewhere after killing all the cookies the site has set, usually without consent. Or again, people like me that persevere and choose ‘deny all’ to the cookie popup only to be presented with a popup asking me to kill my ad blocker. Again, I click away as must others. You would think that such information would be useful in order to shape the future of their website and maybe do away with the privacy invasive bits so they do not need to gain consent anyway… but I suspect that such statistics are ignored, or not available anyway.

Meanwhile, this rant has left me still needing to cancel a part of my energy contract and deciding whether to phone or wait and try online tomorrow, or apply a sledgehammer solution and cancel the direct debit with the bank and let them sort it out!