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Data protection Privacy

Proof of existence

In the march to get rid of paper records and have everything online it is becoming increasingly difficult to prove one’s details when signing up to, or dealing with a process still based on old school mechanisms such as requiring bank statements and proof of address. This, plus the fact that in becoming ever more online the World is requiring people to own and know how to use a mobile phone while having little, if any regard to the affordability of such an item. Cursory throw-away lines such as pointing people without online access at home to their public library is becoming increasingly moot with library closures and, not least with Covid19.

Examples of the complexities one may face are rife but here are two real-world examples, carefully crafted so as to not give any names away.

Person A works for organisation B and is changing roles within B. B needs two proofs of ID and two of address from A for the new role. However, A only has one proof of address, a bank statement. B states that a second bank account will do. A can open a bank account with another bank (C) online. C only needs a single proof of ID and a single proof of address, and A’s existing bank statement will suffice for the latter. Therefore, C has a lesser requirement for proof of ID and address than B and will provide a second proof of address to A to send to B. While one may argue that C has too low a burden of proof or that B has one too high one cannot get round the fact that B already has all the information It needs as it is A’s employer.

Another example. A needs government department B to change some details about property C. B will not accept the evidence available to A but government department D does hold valid details about C. B tells A to purchase these from D. Why? Both B and D are government departments. In this case A simply dropped the issue given they had informed B of an error in the records held by B regardless of whether or not B would do anything about it.

In both the above cases the organisation in question (B in each case) has access, directly or otherwise to the information that they require from A. In the first example via existing employment records, and in the second by simply requesting it from another department.

Now, in each case, if A had an official government-scheme ID card, as was proposed and shot to bits several years ago in the UK, B would not require any further information because all such information would be tied into the ID card provided to A. A hypothesis therefore exists that the establishment, governmental, quasi-governmental and commercial, are collectively making processes so hard for all the ‘A’s in the country that a future proposal for all citizens to be issued with ID cards will succeed by the mere fact that people are so fed up with having to find more exotic ways of proving their existence that they will not vote against it.

That cannot be right.